The Lord is the shade at your right hand.
Psalm 121:5

In the heavens, God has pitched a tent for the sun.
Psalm 19:4

There’s been talk of potential life in outer space.

Life at the deepest levels of the sea.

But there’s another plane of life that seems the most mysterious, and that is the life-force in inner space, or the soul.

There’s a trend lately called “Hygge” which is the Danish notion of cozy conviviality. It’s a way of infusing life with comforts that make you feel at home wherever you are.

I’ve done that in the corner of my kitchen, putting a tiny lamp and candle onto a table so small, it’s not even big enough for a plate! I perch my coffee mug with its jaunty lid there, look out at the colorful flowers in the yard, and feel a sense of peace.

It made me wonder if there is such a thing as “Hygge for the Soul.”

Where do you feel most at home? Most yourself? For many of us, it involves looking at the beauty of nature in some way.

Of course, God created nature, not just as an adjunct to serve the needs of mankind – he also tends to nature as he takes care of us.

Pitching a tent for the sun has got to be like a production of Cirque du Soleil, on a universal scale!

Now, when he sculpted the sun, he made it capable of providing both wonderful warmth and searing sunburns.

When he crafted shade, he made it capable of providing relief from the heat and also clandestine cover for shady business.

The same one who created the gentle spring breeze also made hurricanes. It seems to me that in every powerful thing that can cause both life and destruction, God created a relief valve.

Just as there’s an eye in the middle of storms, it’s possible to find moments of repose, right where you are. It might be just a square foot of space in the corner of your kitchen, but now, it’s your own sacred sanctuary.

What do you practice? 

I learned a new phrase recently — live in the pause.    At the end of each yoga practice, our instructor reads something inspirational.  Sometimes it is poetry.  Sometimes a bit of a song.  Sometimes scripture.  The other day, it was the quote in the meme.

As is so often the case when Leslie reads something, this was just what I needed to hear.  A reminder to take a deep breath and pause.  Take your time.  Think it over.  Say a little prayer.  And then if you still need to say it, go ahead.  After all, you can never take something back.  You’ll always have another chance to speak your mind.

I had just finished making up a new batch of memes, including the one above, when I got to try out that pause.  I had just posted a meme in the Inaugurate Light Project community.  I explained that I know I’ve been posting a lot of Christian quotes.  I am, after all, Christian and it is the philosophy I know best.  If someone else from another tradition wants to share quotes, I’ll gladly make up the memes if they will send me quotes.

To my surprise, someone responded almost immediately.  As I read the response my shoulders tightened.  How dare I assume everyone in the group is Christian?  Not everyone is and although this person wanted to share memes she can’t when I post something Christian.  And on and on and on.

I started to type out my response.  It was sharp.  It was a bit rude.  Okay, more than a bit.  I even worked in the new short hand my son had explained to me.  ^^ stands for “read what I wrote above.”

But then I paused.  I said a little prayer.  This was an opportunity to show someone a little tolerance which is what the group is all about.  No, I hadn’t been shown much, but that really wasn’t the point.

I deleted my original comment.  Then I carefully wrote out a new one.  Live in the pause.

It isn’t easy.  But it doesn’t wear on your all day the way that getting in an argument does.

Take a deep breath.  Pause.  Pray.  Chances are, you won’t regret it.

–SueBE

 

 

Was there ever a time when “poet” was a legitimate job description? Maybe, centuries ago, you could get a gig as a court poet, or have a de Medici support you as a contribution to the arts. Sadly, today, the de Medicis among us have very little use for poetry. It is a gift, but not a commodity. And spiritual poetry, alas, with its propensity to probe and question, comfort yet cause unease, is relegated to the bottom of the artistic heap. This can disheartening, yet I can’t stop an intense desire to live within the world of words (however imperfectly I receive them) that God supplies so temptingly and freely.

I ask for tongues of fire:
ashes appear.
Underneath there is heat,
seething, sufficient
to melt me to the bone.
If I could bury myself in poetry,
I might burn righteously,
pure as glass, pious as
a Lutheran steeple.
But poetry is no place to live,
even for church mice.
No one subsists on words,
even if they roll off the tongue
like buttered toffee.
I must be content
to live in the world of man.
Secretly, however, I burn.

 

 

A bit of colorful inspiration for the day. How are you going to live your faith?

Spread joy when others are sowing disharmony.

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