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It can be awfully hard you were wrong, especially when you jumped to a conclusion and held firm against a loud outcry.  I think that’s why things get heated so quickly on social media.

Gather facts?  Pfft.

It is much more important to post first and loudly stake your claim.  “This is my take on this situation and everyone else is an idiot!”

Name calling stirs up emotion and pretty soon we are demanding everyone take sides.  It’s no wonder that people find it so difficult to change their stance when facts emerge.

It’s enough to make me wonder if “slow” was a 2018 thing that we won’t see anymore.  Slow food was home cooked and often took a full day to simmer.  Slow crafting meant knitting or quilting a gift by hand vs employing a machine.

Maybe those of us who gather together at PrayPower can start a slow news or slow opinion trend.  Facts must be gathered.  It may take days if not longer.  While we wait, we can cook and knit and pray.  We can break the chain that holds us fast to pandering to Facebook for likes and free ourselves from seeking retweets.

Slow.  Prayerful.  Considered.

–SueBE

 

Years ago, I worked in the communications department at a pharma company, and it was time for my performance review.  “You’re doing a great job,” my manager said. “You’re a quick learner, you’ve got great energy… overall, I have to say, I think you’re terrific.”

“So do I,” I said in return. I realized that it sounded like I was saying that I agreed; I AM terrific!

She laughed and said, “Self-esteem isn’t an issue for you either, I see!”

“Oh!  You know what I mean.  I think you’re terrific too.”  She said she knew what I meant and we went off to have lunch.

I suppose on the scale of self-esteem, it’s better to have too much of it, as opposed to not having enough.  But what is about the display of healthy self-esteem that sometimes makes us pause?

On Twitter, I was going to follow Reba McEntire but stopped short – on her own profile, she described herself as a “Country Superstar.” Capital letters and all.

Hmph!  I sniffed.  There’s one gal who really thinks highly of herself!  Miss Thing really toots her own horn there, doesn’t she?

The thing is, though…. when you think about it…. she actually is a country superstar.

Would I prefer the false modesty of someone with powerful pipes like that saying, “aw shucks, I can sing a little”?

A link on Twitter took me to an article quoting Beyonce on her recent performances.  “I felt very proud because this is my legacy,” she announced.

Well!  I never.  Maybe Princess would like a tiara with that “Halo?” The thing is… she did sing at the President’s inauguration, and then was the featured performer at the Superbowl, so I guess…even though it is a bit over-the-top for her to say it… maybe it is her legacy.

I like the way Tom Hanks describes himself on his Twitter profile:  “I’m that actor in some of the movies you liked and some you didn’t.  Sometimes I’m in pretty good shape, other times I’m not. Hey, you gotta  live, you know?”  He doesn’t mention his Oscar or his bazillion dollars.  He seems humble. That’s how a celebrity should be, I said to myself.

I finally got my head out of the Twitterverse and administered the only known cure for grumpy grumbling: a Bible verse.

“Gracious words are a honeycomb, sweet to the soul and healing to the bones.”  Proverbs 16:24

Lesson for today: be gracious toward everyone, and think of it as a good thing when people think highly of themselves.  Be glad that they’re blooming wherever they’re planted, and leave the pruning up to God.  Live and let live.  Love and let go.

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Have a Mary Little Christmas

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